Human Health

How Experience Changes Basics of Memory Formation

July 23, 2018

We know instinctively that our experiences shape the way we learn. If we are highly familiar with a particular task, like cooking for example, learning a new recipe is much easier than it was when we were a novice. New research from the University of California, Davis, shows that experience also changes the way our neurons become plastic and form new memories.  

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Discovering Curiosity: Age-Related Hearing Loss

June 06, 2018

As our bodies age, we all face some decline in our senses, and among the senses most susceptible to deterioration is hearing.

Hearing loss is a substantial problem for society. It’s the third most common physical condition after arthritis and heart disease and about 30 percent of adults between ages 65 and 74 and nearly half of people over 75 experience some difficulty hearing.  It’s a social problem, one that can lead to isolation and depression.

Jennifer Whistler: On the Search for Safer Opioids

March 08, 2018

The opioid epidemic has been called the “deadliest drug crisis in American history” by the New York Times. Overdoses claim the lives of more than 90 Americans each day, and about two million people battle substance abuse disorders stemming from prescription opioids, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Advocating a Computational Shift in Neuroscience Training

December 04, 2017

How can universities best prepare students for a career in neuroscience? Ask Professor Mark Goldman, Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior and the Center for Neuroscience, and he’ll tell you it’s time to rethink the traditional biology curriculum. To unravel complex systems like the brain, students need advanced training in quantitative and computational techniques.

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Researchers Temporarily Turn off Brain Area to Better Understand Function

July 20, 2016

Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers at the California National Primate Research Center, or CNPRC, at the University of California, Davis, have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining brain.

The research suggests that alterations in the functional connectivity of the brain in humans may be used to determine the sites of pathology in complex disorders such as schizophrenia and autism.

Exercise is really, really good for your brain

March 01, 2016

Physical exercise is good for your brain. And I mean really good for it. The brain burns a ton of energy during exercise, much more, even, than if you were thinking really hard about something really complicated. New research has discovered just what the brain does with all that extra energy.

A Choice to Heal Documentary…Mental Health in California

June 01, 2014

The Mental Health Services Oversight & Accountability Commission features Dr. Cameron Carter, Center for Neuroscience Director and Director of the Early Diagnosis and Preventive Treatment Clinic, in a video documentary. Please contact us if you are interested in receiving a DVD copy (limited availability).