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Center for Neuroscience - Health and Safety

Lab Glass

 

Laboratory Waste Management

 

Trash

Equipment Disposal

Non-hazardous Lab Waste

Biohazardous Waste

Chemotherapeutic Agents

Sharps (needles, syringes, contaminated broken glass, pipette tips)

Laboratory Glass (non-hazardous)

Chemical Waste/Large Dry-cell & Lead Acid Batteries/UV Light Bulbs

Non-hazardous Animal Carcass Disposal

Biohazardous Animal Carcass Disposal

Radioactive Waste

Controlled Drug Disposal

Recyclable Items

Waste Minimization

General Work Practices

 

Trash

  • Only non-hazardous, non-laboratory waste can go in the trash. For more information see Safety Net #12 "Why didn't the custodian pick up my trash."
  • Fold cardboard boxes and place them on the inside of the lab near the door for custodial pick up or take them to the cardboard recycle bin.

Equipment Disposal

  • To dispose of unused, unwanted or broken equipment, complete an Equipment Disposal Form and submit it to the CNS Equipment Manager. Be sure to include the UCOP number from the asset tag. The UCOP number is the number that begins with a year. For more information, see the Equipment Disposal page.

Non-hazardous Lab Waste

  • All lab waste that is not hazardous must be placed in clear bags to be autoclaved. 
  • Place the bag in a secondary container before taking it to the autoclave room.
  • Use the autoclave that is specifically marked for “Lab Waste.”
  • For non-hazardous waste, purchase bags that DO NOT have the biohazard symbol on the bag. 
  • Throw autoclaved non-hazardous lab waste into the trash.

Biohazardous Waste 

  • For biohazardous waste at SOM Neurosciences, follow the disposal guidelines in the UC Davis Medical Waste Management Plan.
  • For biohazardous waste at the Annex, follow the disposal guidelines in this SOP.
  • For spills, see Safety Net 127 " Guidelines for Biological Spill Clean-up."

 

Chemotherapeutic Agents

  • Place liquid chemotherapeutic waste in an appropriately labeled yellow hard-walled container
  • Submit all chemotherapeutic waste to Stericycle (An account with Stericycle must be set up prior to using chemotherapeutic agents.)
  • Place the container at the accumulation site, or call Stericycle when the container is ready for pick up.

 

Sharps (needles, syringes, contaminated broken glass, pipette tips)

  • Place sharps in a hard-walled “sharps” container.
  • When the container reaches the “full” line, close the lid so that the container is sealed. 
    • Biohazardous Sharps:
      • Use a red sharps container labeled with the “biohazard” label.
      • Label the container with the building address and room number.
      • Take the sealed container and place it in the red biohazard toter.
      • Note: Biohazardous sharps containers must be properly disposed of within 7 days of sealing the container.
    • Non-hazardous Sharps:
      • Place non-biohazardous sharps in a clear sharps container.  If the container has a biohazard label, be sure to deface the label with a sharpie pen.
      • When full, seal the container and place in the red biohazard toter.
    • Chemotherapeutic Agent Contaminated Sharps:
      • Place sharps in a yellow sharps container labeled with the appropriate chemotherapy waste label.
      • Submit sharps to Stericycle (see “Chemotherapeutic Agents” above).
    • Radioactive Waste Sharps:
      • Place in a non-red sharps container.
      • Label the container with “radioactive” tape.
      • Place the labeled container in a radioactive waste box.
  • Note: The preferred method of disposing pipette tips is in hard-walled sharps containers. However, pipette tips are allowed to be disposed as non-sharps, as long as they are double bagged in a thick bag and disposed of according to Safety Net #3.
  • For more information see Safety Net #3

 

Laboratory Glass (non-hazardous)

  • Place broken glass and unwanted laboratory glassware in a sturdy cardboard container that has a lid.
  • Identify the container by writing the lab name and number on the container.
  • When the container is full, seal the lid and place the container in the trash bin.
  • Deface empty glass chemical containers of 5 gallons or less and discard them in the trash (or glass recycle if available.)
  • For more information, see Safety Net #3

 Lab Glass Waste

Improperly Sealed Container

 

Chemical Waste/Large Dry-cell & Lead Acid Batteries/UV Light Bulbs

  • Dispose of chemical waste within 9 months of its beginning accumulation date.
  • An EH&S representative will accept chemical waste, large dry-cell batteries, and Lead Acid Batteries every other month at 1515 Newton Ct. room 425.
  • To find the scheduled pick up dates and times, access the CNS Safety web site: http://neuroscience.ucdavis.edu/healthandsafety/HazardousMaterialsPickUp.html
  • Prior to the day of the pick up, request pick up through WASTe.
  • All chemicals must have a complete Hazardous Waste Tag attached to them (see WASTe Fact Sheet for more information).
  • Labs in 1515 Newton Ct., 1544 Newton Ct. and the CNS-Annex
    • Take your properly tagged chemicals, in secondary containment, that have already been submitted for pick up to room 425 during the scheduled date/time.
  • DO NOT leave abandoned chemicals in or around the room, you must personally deliver the chemicals to the EH&S representative.
  • Deface empty glass or plastic chemical containers of 5 gallons or less and throw them in the trash, recycle, or reuse. (See Safety Net #124 for information on empty container management).
  • For information regarding Ethidium Bromide detoxification, see Safety Net #53.
  • For more information regarding Chemical Waste Disposal, see Safety Net #8.
  • For information on chemical spills see Safety Net #13 "Guidelines for Chemical Spill Control." 
  • Disinfect UV light bulbs and submit them as hazardous waste during the normal waste pick up schedule.

Non-hazardous Animal Carcass Disposal

  • Place carcasses in the freezer in room 425 at 1515 Newton Ct. for pick up.
  • Complete the information in the sign-in log on the table on the east wall of room 425. 

Biohazardous Animal Carcass Disposal

  • Place carcasses in a red biohazard bag in a designated carcass disposal freezer at an approved pick up location.
  • Call Stericycle to pick up carcasses in the freezer. Make sure they give you a manifest document.
  • Give a copy of the manifest document to the CNS Safety Manager.

Radioactive Waste

  • Liquid Scintillation Vials:
    • Submit liquid scintillation vials on a separate “Radiological Waste Disposal Request Form.”
    • EH&S will call the lab to schedule pick up of the liquid scintillation vials.
  • Submit all other radioactive waste pick up requests to EH&S online: http://safetyapps.ucdavis.edu/EHS/RadForms/radwaste.cfm
  • For more information, see Safety Net #9 

Controlled Drug Disposal

  • The person having custody of the controlled substance must request disposal from EH&S at (530) 752-1493.
  • For more information see PPM 290-70

Recyclable Items

  • Visit SUSTAINABLE2ndCENTURY - Recycle, for what you can and can't recycle on campus.
  • Batteries: Small dry-cell batteries can be sent by campus mail to "Batteries for Recycling- ESF."  Please do not send wet-cell batteries through the campus mail system.
  • Recycle larger dry-cell batteries and lead acid batteries by submitting them to EH&S on the designated pick up day (see above).
  • Bottles/cans/paper: Place bottles, cans and paper in the appropriate recycle containers.
  • Wood Pallets: Contact Utilities Solid Waste for disposal

Waste Minimization

  • Practice good housekeeping techniques in your laboratory.
  • Develop a centralized chemical purchasing, inventory, tracking and storage system.
  • Purchase and use the smallest quantity of chemical needed and rotate chemical stock to prevent chemicals from becoming too old to use.
  • Use chemicals in small volumes.
  • Examine laboratory procedures and substitute less-hazardous or recyclable chemicals whenever possible.
  • Incorporate processes for hazardous waste minimization into existing experimental protocols to reduce final volumes of chemical wastes.  Neutralize or detoxify intermediates and byproducts during the experimental process.  Treat or destroy hazardous products as the last step in experiments.
  • Reuse and/or recycle spent solvents and recover metal from spent catalyst.
  • Segregate hazardous waste from non-hazardous waste.
  • Segregate incompatible waste streams.
  • Clearly mark/label contents of all hazardous waste containers 

General Work Practices

  • Store hazardous wastes in a suitable container in good condition.
  • Keep the container sealed when you are not actively putting waste in it.
  • Keep the hazardous waste container in a secondary container.
  • Segregate all wastes by compatibility to prevent a chemical reaction (i.e. acids with acids, bases with bases).
  • Maintain hazardous wastes in a secure area.
  • Limit access of hazardous waste to those who are properly trained.
  • The penalty for improper waste disposal (i.e. pouring hazardous waste down the drain) is fine/imprisonment.
  • Wastes that are not hazardous should be labeled as “non-hazardous waste” or “trash.”  Do not label non-hazardous waste as “waste.”
  • DO NOT pick up broken glass with your hands, if possible.  Wear cut-resistance gloves and use a broom.  Collect broken glass as carefully and completely as possible.
  • Store medical waste in the lab in a red bag in a labeled (biohazard), rigid, leak-proof secondary container with tight closing lid.
  • Dispose of red biohazard bags within seven days of initial use.
  • Clean biohazard containers monthly or immediately if a leak occurs using a 10% bleach solution with a ten minute contact time or a quaternary ammonium solution with a 3 minute contact time.
  • Clean up spills immediately. 
    • For chemical spill instructions, see Safety Net #13
    • For medical waste spill instructions, see Safety Net #127 " Guidelines for Biological Spill Clean-up."