Second Year Courses and Beyond

Advanced Graduate Courses

NSC 243 - Topics in Cellular and Behavioral Neurobiology Lecture/Discussion -1 hour. An advanced examination of several current problems in neurobiology. Topics will vary in different years; may be repeated for credit. Instructor: Ishida

NSC 261A - Topics on Vision Lecture/Discussion - 2 hours. Visual system functions and underlying mechanisms. Emphasis on recent research and pertinent aspects of anatomy, biochemistry, electrophysiology, psychophysics, development and genetics. Topics may vary each year. Offered every other year. Instructor: Ishida

NSC 298A - Advanced Cellular Neurobiology Lecture/Discussion. This course covers selected topics on neurophysiology, from ion channels to simple circtuits, for students with a major interest in cellular neuroscience. Topics to be covered include channel biophysics, action potentioal propagation, intracellular signal transduction pathways, synaptic physiology and quantal analysis, cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and neuromodulation of synaptic circuitry. Instructors: Burns, Chen, and Mulloney

NSC 220 - Seminar Speaking Lecture/Presentations - 3 hours. Each student will present a formal, 45-minute seminar (using power point or slides) to members of the Center for Neuroscience. Students are encouraged to present 2 seminars, each in consecutive quarters. Seminar topics are student-selected, and must be discussed with the instructor prior to selection. Offered Winter and Spring quarters. Instructor: McAllister and DeBello

NSC/NPB 216 - Ion Channels Lecture - 3 hours. Graduate level courses on properties of ion channels. Offered alternating years. Instructor: TBD

MED 420 - Clinical Neuroscience Lecture. This is an excellent class to learn about different neurological diseases, their etiologies, and their treatments. A variety of lecturers parade through, of varying quality. It is advised that students review the schedule to see if any lectures are of any interest. Instructor: Gorin

NPB 270 - How to Write a Fundable Grant Proposal Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in a life science and consent of instructor. Familiarization with the skills required to craft a successful grant proposal submitted to extramural agencies such as NIH and NSF. Instructor: Burns

NPB 292 - Cortical Plasticity and Perception Lecture/Discussion - 2 hours. Examination of research articles on cortical plasticity and changes in perception. Examples drawn from studies of the somatosensory, visual auditory, and motor cortex. Offered in alternate years. Instructor: Recanzone

NPB 263 - Modeling in Systems Neuroscience Lecture - 3 hours, Lecture/Laboratory - 1 hour. Modeling as a tool in systems neuroscience. Mathematical techniques will be introduced and used to explore advanced topics on echolocation, sound localization, electroreception, communications, and motor systems. Other topics include transforms, modeling assumptions, scales and linearity. Offered in alternate years. Instructor: Sutter

NPB 163 - Information Processing Models in Neuroscience and Psychology Lecture - 3 hours, term paper. Basic mathematical modeling techniques used in neuroscience and psychology. Specific topics include linear systems theory, Fourier transforms, neural networks, adaptive systems, probabilistic inference and information theory. Emphais on understanding information processing in neural systems. Instructor: Sutter

PSC 209A - Introduction to Programming: Matlab Lecture/laboratory - 3 hours. Tha Matlab programming environment as a means of organizing, analyzing, and visualizing scientific data. Basic programming concepts such as variables, loops, conditional branching, and efficient programming techniques will be emphasized. Instructor: Janata

Specialty Courses

Students are also encouraged to take specialty courses offered during the summers at a number of sites across the country. These courses are often specialized and expose students to experts in a particular field of research. For example, four of our students participated in the "Structure, Function, and Development of the Visual System" 2011 Summer Course at Cold Spring Harbor Labs.

Links to Specialty Courses:

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole

Friday Harbor Laboratory

Bodega Marine Laboratory

Transylvania Experimental Neuroscience Summer School

Elective Courses Offered by Other Departments

BIS 104 - Regulation of Cell Function Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101 and 102; course 103 recommended. Membrane receptors and signal transduction; cell trafficking; cell cycle, cell growth and division; extracellular matrix and cell-cell junctions; cell development; immune system.-- Baskin, Crowe, Etzler, McNally, Myles, Nuccitelli, Privalsky, Scholey, Shiozaki

BIM 241 - Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 9D, Mathematics 22B. Equipment, methods, medical applications of MRI. Lectures review basic, advanced pulse sequences, image reconstruction, display and technology and how these are applied clinically. Lecture complements a more technical course. Buonocore

BIM 246 - Magnetic Resonance Technology Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 9D, Mathematics 22B. Course covers MRI technology at an advanced level with emphasis on mathematical descriptions and problem solving. Topics include spin dynamics, signal generation, image reconstruction, pulse sequences, biophysical basis of T1, T2, RF, gradient coil design, signal to noise, image artifacts Buonocore

Med 403 - Fundamentals of Clinical Psychiatry. This course gives a great overview of different psychiatric disorders, their diagnoses and treatment. Consistently entertaining lectures with fascinating videos. This course includes weekly trips to the Sacramento Mental Health Treatment Center. There you meet with and interview patients in some unforgettable encounters. I don't recommend taking this for credit, though. The exams are very Pharm-intensive, so unless you know psychiatric medications like the back of your hand, audit this one.

ECS 030 - Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving Lecture - 3 hours; discussion--1 hour. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16A or 21A (may be taken concurrently); prior experience with basic programming concepts (variable, loops, conditional statements) recommended. Introduction to computers and computer programming, algorithm design, and debugging. Elements of good programming style. Programming in the C language. Use of basic UNIX tools Ruschitzka

EDO 218 - Mammalian Endocrinology and Homeostasis Lecture - 4 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 102 and 103, Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 101, and consent of instructor. Biochemical, physiological, and regulatory properties of the mammalian endocrine system, at the molecular, cellular and systemic level. Signal transduction mechanisms and hormonal actions. Principles that regulate homeostasis, especially in organ_organ interrelationships, metabolism and minerals, fluids and electrolytes. Reproductive endocrinology Turgeon

GGG 201B - Cytogenetics Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: course 201A or consent of instructor. Study of cytogenetics including meiosis, recombination, chromosomes, haploidy, aneuploidy, trisomics, monosomics, autopolyploids and intra- and interspecific manipulation

GGG 201C - Molecular Genetics Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: course 201A or consent of instructor. Current topics in molecular genetics at a graduate level, with emphasis on the relationship between classical genetic studies and current molecular research, as well as on the molecular techniques used to develop the basic concepts of molecular genetics

GGG 201D - Quantitative and Population Genetics Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: course 201A or consent of instructor. The basic concepts of quantitative and population genetics, including gene and genotypic frequencies, multiple factor hypothesis, phenotypic and genotypic values, heritability, selection, genetic variation and evolution in populations, and experimental methodologies

MAT 227 - Scientific Computation Applied to Problems in Biology Lecture - 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Numerical solution of differential equations is studied using programming environments such as Maple, Mathematica and Matlab. Emphasis on understanding why numerical algorithms work. Particular attention to the application of these algorithms to problems in biology

MAT 222 - Introduction to Biofluid Dynamics Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Population Biology 231/Ecology 231 and Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 245 or consent of instructor. The basic principles of fluid dynamics are introduced in the first half of the course by describing various phenomena studies from a biofluids perspective. The equations of fluid motion associated with these phenomena are derived and studied in the second half

MCB 255 - Molecular Mechanisms in Animal Development Lecture - 1.5 hours; seminar--1.5 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor; introductory background in developmental biology and molecular genetics recommended. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms that control animal development, with a special focus on multiple levels of gene regulation. Experimental systems including Drosophila, amphibians, C. elegans, and mice will be discussed. Readings will be taken from current literature. Offered in alternate years Natzle, L. Rose

MCB 262 - Transgenic Expression Systems Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 101 and course 161 or consent of instructor. The molecular biology underlying current transgenic expression systems. Strategies for achieving regulated expression and secretion of proteins. Survey of bacterial, yeast, insect cell, mammalian cell, plant and animal expression systems. Offered in alternate years.

MCB 221D - Cellular Biochemistry Lecture - 3 hours; discussion--1 hour. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 102, course 221A or the equivalent or consent of instructor. Molecular structure and biocphysical properties of cell membranes; organelle biogenesis and trafficking; signal transduction, metabolism and metabolic regulation; cytoplasmic organization, biophysics of the cytoskeleton and force-generating mechanisms, mechanism of intracellular transport and mitosis; cell reproduction and the cell cycle. - II. (II.) McNally, Nunnari, Powers, Scholey

MCB 241 - Membrane Biology Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 102, 104, or consent of instructor. Advanced topics on membrane biochemistry and biophysics. How the unique properties of biomembranes relate to various roles in cell biology and physiology (same course as Biophysics 241.) Longo, Voss

MCB 255 - Molecular Mechanisms in Animal Development Lecture - 1.5 hours; seminar - 1.5 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor; introductory background in developmental biology and molecular genetics recommended. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms that control animal development, with a special focus on multiple levels of gene regulation. Experimental systems including Drosophila, amphibians, C. elegans, and mice will be discussed. Readings will be taken from current literature. Offered in alternate years. Natzle, L. Rose

NPB 245 - Computational Models of Cellular Signaling Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Computational and mathematical techniques in modeling of regulatory and signaling phenomena in neurobiology and cell physiology, focusing on linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equation models. Applications include ion channel kinetics, electrical activity, signal transduction, calcium oscillations, and simple neural circuits.

NPB 101L - Systemic Physiology Lab Laboratory - 3 hours; discussion - 2 hours. Prerequisite: course 101 prior to taking 101L recommended, but 101 may be taken concurrently. Selected experiments to illustrate functional characteristics of organ systems discussed in course 101. Bautista, Goldberg, Liets

PBG 231 - Mathematical Methods in Population Biology Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16C or 21C or the equivalent. Mathematical methods used in population biology. Linear and nonlinear difference equation and differential equation models are studied, using stability analysis and qualitative methods. Partial differential equation models are introduced. Applications to population biology models are stressed. (Same course as Ecology 231) Hastings

PBG 200B - Principles of Population Biology Lecture - 5 hours; discussion - 1 hour. Prerequisite: course 200A, 231. Principles of multi-species communities. Topics include competition, mutualism, metapopulations, food webs and trophic cascades, interactions between simple ecological communities, island biogeography, succession, and large-scale patterns.

PBG 200C - Principles of Population Biology Lecture - 5 hours; discussion - 1 hour. Prerequisite: course 200B. Principles of microevolution and macroevolution. Topics include evolutionary quantitative genetics, analysis of hybrid zones, speciation, the fossil record, biogeography, and phylogeny reconstruction.

PBI 223 - Special Topics in Scientific Method Discussion - 2 hours. Examine the historical and philosophical background of the scientific method. Analyze the rational, perceptual, causal, creative and social aspects of scientific knowledge. Clarify the roles of reason, experimentation and creativity in scientific research. (S/U grading only.) Bradford

MCIP 216 - Neurophysiology Literature Lecture - 1 hour; discussion - 2 hours. Lectures covering experimental and theoretical methods in studying cell membrane ion channels and the resulting characterization of the physiological functions and structure/function relationships of some of the most important channel types. Discussion of classical and current original papers.--I. (I.) Pappone

MCIP 200L - Animal Cell Culture Laboratory Discussion - 2 hours; laboratory - 6 hours. Prerequisite: courses in undergraduate biochemistry, cell biology, or general physiology, or consent of instructor. Techniques of cell culture, with emphases on cell physiology and the actions of drugs and toxicants on cultured somatic cells. Design, performance and interpretation of experiments with animal cells in vitro.--II. (II.) B. Wilson, R. Wu

MCIP 242 - Biological Rhythms Lecture - 2 hours; lecture/discussion - 1 hour. Prerequisite: Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 110 or the equivalent. General aspects and basic mechanisms of biological rhythms; the importance of rhythm desynchronization in areas of pharmacology and space medicine; telemetry; mathematical methods; chronometry; daily, reproductive, and annual periods; shift-work, jet lag and sleep disorders. Offered in alternate years.--(I.) Fuller

MCIP 291D - Research Approaches in Physiology Seminar - 2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Graduate Group in Physiology or consent of instructor. Current research in physiology. Overall design of experiments and particular research areas. (S/U grading only.)--II. (II.) Eiserich, Raybould

PGG 390 - The Teaching of Physiology Discussion - 1 hour. Prerequisite: Teaching Assistant assignment to a physiology lecture course and consent of instructor. Practical experience in methods and problems of teaching physiology lecture courses. May include analyses of texts and supporting material, discussion of teaching techniques, preparing for and conducting discussion sessions, and formulation of topics and questions for examinations under supervision of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)--I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

MCIP 231 - Neuroendocrinology Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 110 or the equivalent course in systemic physiology; Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 130 or the equivalent course in endocrinology. Neural-endocrine interactions; neural regulation of the endocrine system, especially in relation to reproduction; the role of hormones and growth factors in sexual differentiation of the brain.

MCIP 234 - Neurophysiological Basis of Neurotoxicology Lecture - 3 hours. Prerequisite: Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 110 or the equivalent; basic understanding of neurophysiology. Mechanisms of action at the cellular and systemic level of a number of different neurotoxins and toxicants. Examples of ways toxins may act on the nervous system and techniques for study of neurotoxicology. (Same course as Environmental Toxicology 234.)--I. (I.) Wooley

PSC 131 - Perception Lecture - 3 hours; independent library work. Prerequisite: courses 1, 41. The cognitive organizations related to measurable physical energy changes mediated through sensory channels. The perception of objects, space, motion, events.--I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Post, Whitney

PSC 204B - Causal Modeling Correlational Data Lecture - 4 hours. Prerequisite: course 204A or the equivalent or consent of instructor. Examination of how to make causal inferences from correlational data in the behavioral sciences. Emphasis on testing rival causal models using correlations among observed variables. Beginning with multiple regression analysis, discussion advances to path analysis and related techniques.—II. Simonton. See http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/simonton/p204bwmain.html.

PSC 220 - History of Psychology Lecture - 2 hours; seminar - 2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or consent of instructor. A lecture-seminar on the history of psychology and on the applicability of early psychological theory and research to contemporary investigations. Offered in alternate years. Simonton. See http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/simonton/p185wmain.html.

PSC 204A - Statistical Analysis of Psychological Experiments Lecture - 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Psychology or consent of instructor. Probability theory, sampling distributions, statistical inference, and hypothesis testing using standard parametric and correlational approaches. Analysis of variance, factorial and repeated measures, and tests of trends. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 206. (Former course 206.)--I. (I.)

PTX 201 - Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology I Lecture - 5 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 102 and Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 101. First of three courses presenting fundamental principles of pharmacology and toxicology. Introductory overview of basic concepts in pharmacology/toxicology, followed by in-depth blocks on fate processes of chemicals in the body, fate processes in tissue selective responses, selective toxicity employed therapeutically.--I. (I.)

PTX 202 - Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology II Lecture - 4 hours. Prerequisite: course 201. The second of three courses presenting fundamental principles of pharmacology and toxicology. Principles of pharmacodynamics and mechanisms of drug/toxicant actions.--II. (II.)

PTX 203 - Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology III Lecture - 4 hours. Prerequisite: courses 201 and 202. Integrated physiological systems, cardiovascular and nervous systems and how drugs and toxicants act to perturb function.--III. (III.)

STA 100 - Applied Statistics for Biological Sciences Lecture - 3 hours; laboratory - 2 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16B or the equivalent. Probability computation/modeling, estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables, ANOVA, regression; implementation of statistical methods using computer package. Only two units credit allowed to students who have taken course 13 or 32. Not open for credit to students who have taken course 102. GE credit SciEng.--I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

STA 104 - Applied Statistical Methods: Nonparametric Statistics Lecture - 3 hours; laboratory - 1 hour. Prerequisite: course 13, 32, or 102. Sign and Wilcoxon tests, Walsh averages. Two-sample procedures. Inferences concerning scale. Kruskal-Wallis test. Measures of association. Chi square and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng.--(II.)

STA 106 - Applied Statistical Methods: Analysis of Variance Lecture - 4 hours. Prerequisite: course 13, 32, or 102. One-way and two-way fixed effects analysis of variance models. Randomized complete and incomplete block design, Latin squares. Multiple comparisons procedures. One-way random effects model. GE credit: SciEng.--I, II. (I, II.)

STA 108 - Applied Statistical Methods: Regression Analysis Lecture - 3 hours; discussion - 1 hour. Prerequisite: course 13, 32 or 102. Simple linear regression, variable selection techniques, stepwise regression, analysis of covariance, influence measures, computing packages. GE credit: SciEng.--I, II, III. (I, II, III.)